New work complete

“Early morning-colour jump” is finished. It’s from the “Contemplation” series of works. This piece is dynamic and energised with lively colour contrasts, detailed marks and spontaneous brushwork. It’s a playful piece, hence including “jump” in the title. The landscape is referenced, with forms seemingly emerging in a rural setting….the indistinct shapes can only be guessed at. I had a lot of fun making this painting and maybe this is reflected in it, and I encourage the viewer to let their eye roam around the surface and gently observe whatever will be encountered.

Early-morning-colour-jump

“Early morning-colour jump”  51x51cm  $370(AUD)

Latest Remembrance painting is up

I’ve recently completed another Remembrance painting, “Remembrance: Wetland swamp”. It’s a collation of many memories and some experiences of these dark and mysterious places. I love the way the bright and often grassy edge to wetlands is so vibrant in vivid greens, and bumps up against the dark secretive swamp area….the contrast is stark. In this painting I’ve made use of quick marks which act as detail in large one toned or coloured parts. The “marks” are important parts of all my paintings and though they may be small, are actually very powerful strong pieces of the picture acting as contrast or detail in open areas. Each mark is quite considered even though it has the appearance of being spontaneous. In “Wetland swamp” I’ve also employed the hidden/revealed approach to large areas of colour and there is a lot of complexity in the work. This gives the painting depth and an aliveness throughout. This painting is available for sale at $570.

Remembrance: Wetland swamp

Remembrance: Wetland swamp $570 101x76cm

Artwork for March, “City Lights”

It’s an oldie, but a good one! I made “City Lights” quite a few years ago, being inspired by night time lights in the city and near the Brisbane river. Some of the colours are really bright and this reflects the idea of neon lighting. There’s also a watery appearance to this piece, seen in the darker sections would could be read as buildings or water. I overlaid the central section with white dots to emphasise the notion of direct harsh and bright lights. The technique was very direct, spontaneous, with a strong sense of immediacy. This painting was always well received by viewers and I certainly enjoyed its making.

New painting…here’s my process

I’ve been working on a new piece for a few weeks and I thought I’d show some images of my abstract painting process. This painting started out as some curved sprayed lines of paint with a few areas of rough and runny paint sections. It belongs in the genre of the “unplanned” paintings….the spontaneous “therapeutic” artworks that emerge from the psyche. I work in this style when I feel a bit bogged down, and things become predictable in approach and product. So “Blue curve+spots” is finished up, and I’m feeling satisfied with the result. Below is the completed work. And at the bottom are two images of the final stages of the painting.

blue lines and spots

Blue curve+spots

New work “We are alive”

I’m putting up my newest work “We are alive” for you to view. Its a lively colourful piece of non-objective painting that expresses a joyous freedom in working spontaneously and without references. Once again the painting has emerged seemingly of its own accord in an intuitive manner. I love its colourful response to my desire to create, and the work takes on a life of its own as I do so….it reminds me of summer colours and happiness…and I had fun making it…..love you to feel the same way about “We are alive”!

We are alive

We are alive

Artwork of the month, “Echo”

I’ve recently completed this colourful piece “Echo”, using my spontaneous approach to painting….working with immediacy and not planning at the outset. It could be said that this belongs to my “art as therapy” project. The painting acts as an extension of my own being…it is a way of showing myself to the world, and in the world. The work is very intuitively created without reference to any known object or idea, except to “be itself”. I’ve photographed the process of “Echo”‘s creation, and you can see the process for yourself. Each part is unexpected as it progresses, yet remains very lively with textured areas, scraped lines and sprayed sections. Even though I’m expressing my life at the moment through this work (and other similar works) I feel the painting conveys an atmosphere of optimism and up-liftedness. And I’d like to think that the observer can feel this as well.

 

Art as therapy: therapy as art

I’ve been working with the idea that spontaneous artworks act as a kind of therapy. The process of creation is much more important than a finished product. This requires that I let go of any concepts of how the painting should look, and simply paint purely out of intuition. My abstractions have used this idea in the past, but steps have been very considered, and things changed according to my inner aesthetic requirements and technical knowledge. So I’ve decided to experiment with making a painting without artistic considerations and just go with the emotion of the moment, and gut instinct. This seems to create a very strong interaction with the paint and canvas, and releases a lot of energy. And this process in itself is a kind of therapy; a letting go of the past in many ( even unknown) ways. I’m showing the initial painting done on one afternoon, and the following day I felt as if I had more to process, so I continued till it felt complete. The result could be termed “art”, but just as easily be called “therapy”. And this feels completely valid for me…..here they are.

Process painting

Process painting

The above painting is the first part of the process.

Abstract painting Accidental F

Accidental “F”

Above is the final part of the process, which I’ve named as “Accidental F”……obviously! Below are two close up images of the finished process. In these details you can observe texture, scraped areas, splashes and the use of spray paint…all used spontaneously.

Detail 2

Detail 2

Detail

Detail 1

 

Artwork of the month “Pink and yellow melt”

Running a bit late this month with my regular “Artwork of the month” post. Lots of things happening that needed attending to.

But here it is…on the last day!…I’ll discuss my work “Pink and yellow melt”, which at the moment is part of an exhibition “Revolve” in Adelaide.

Pink and yellow

Pink and yellow melt 70cm x 90 cm $695

This painting was created by an inner need to express the idea of pink adjacent to yellow, and I had quite a struggle in it’s making.

The external appearance of simplicity is not the truth with this work…many layers of paint have been involved in its creation. Within the larger areas of colour there are more subtle tones of similar colour, which can only be seen on closer inspection.

My initial concept was to place two large long areas of yellow and pink against each other, and to maintain their individual vibrancy. I needed the two colours to be delineated yet not in too strict a fashion. To achieve this I used a darker contrasting blue-green hue, and allowed it to run down the side of the pink…this line was too strong so a lot of it was painted out, and this was satisfactory. Originally the pink and yellow both extended to the top border, but I felt this to be overwhelming, so I cut out the top sections with the lighter blue.

I encouraged a lot of runs and dribbles, and although this appears spontaneous, each has been carefully considered to create balance. The dribbling lines act as a kind of patterning, and beneath this the viewer can observe underlying layers. The manner in which these layers are placed invites the question of subject/background, revealed/concealed, and the runs act as points of interest to lead the eye around the painting.

Using large flat brushes to achieve bigger areas of colour I had to remain conscious of the strength of the reddish pink and stop it from shouting. I wanted to maintain the vibrant energy of the work, but made use of quieter pastel colours and white to find a balance.

The overall colour scheme could possibly be described as “feminine” but the method of paint application keeps it from becoming too sweet. The mood created is one of joy and happiness with the world, and hopefully the viewer can experience this while observing the piece.

Time wise, this work took a couple of weeks solid work to complete, and I was really satisfied with the result. I felt I had resolved all problems that were presented both in the concept and in within the painting process.

Vivid new abstractions!

Decided its time to put the new abstractions up….the colour is amazing…the photos don’t do them justice. They have a jewel like quality when you actually view them. These paintings have taken a few weeks to complete, and give very little indication of my starting point under the layers. My best and most vigorous work happens when I act with spontaneity, not becoming too precious with little parts underneath that I liked initially. If things need changing then I just do it…even if something is lost as a result. Intuition is my guide, and if followed then a powerful vibrant painting is made. Finally I check if a harmonious artwork has been made, and I’m satisfied with that.

They will be shown from 11July at Graydon Gallery in New Farm, Brisbane. Hope you like them both!