New residence!

At last we made the big move…to a beautiful mountain…one of our favourite places. Have 1/2 an acre of land, consequently lots of grass mowing! But I hope to fill a lot of the space with gardens. I think it will be an epic project; some years worth. The cooler climate makes it suitable to grow some trees like magnolias and rhododendrons, even maybe a japanese maple and weeping cherry, as well as many smaller shrubs and bulbs. It’s kind of a blank canvas really. I took a few pics yesterday (after the wet weather cleared up) so you can enjoy them. Things seem to grow very quickly on the volcanic red soil, especially after rain.

I’ve also worked on a couple more paintings which I’ll show you soon…so keep an eye out for those!

So…a new lifestyle, and hopefully a change for the better.

My little flowering violas

These little viola plants are happily flowering away, despite the cold(for us) weather. It’s lovely to walk out into the yard and see their charming faces in the garden….and they have a beautiful perfume; like violets, of course.

Big-violas

Happy violas

Some lovely pics from a couple of years ago

Going through all my photos (and there are thousands!), I found a few beauties from a couple of years ago….thought I’d share.

Jacaranda season

Well it’s that time of year where we feast upon the glorious sight of multiple flowering jacaranda trees around our city. Annually people wait for this magnificent mauve display all through the city and suburbs, and also in most sub tropical areas on east coast Australia. The site travels down the coast as the season (and climate) progresses into summer. We look forward to it, yet for uni students it reminds them that exams are fast approaching! They aren’t native trees…South American I believe…but have been grown here in public parks, streets and large suburban gardens for 150 years, and are embraced and celebrated by all. The jacaranda flowering is followed by another vibrant display by south African poinciana trees which are red. I’ve included a couple of extra pics of a leopard tree with its brand new leaves, a golden trumpet tree, a jacaranda with a red Illawarra flame tree (native) and a view of the city from Mt Gravatt. If you look carefully, tiny puffs of mauve appear in the distant suburbs.

Roma St. Parklands

This is a beautiful garden in the city centre, and I’d not visited for years….so we spent a couple of hours there yesterday. There’s a rainforest, plenty of grassy space, a lake and wonderful garden walks, with tons of running/falling water features. It’s much loved by all ages, and at the moment the spring display is really vibrant. These pics are courtesy of Taz.

Mt Tamborine Gardens

One of our favourite spots to visit is the Mt Tamborine Gardens. It’s always a restful day out, and very pleasant strolling around these quiet gardens. There’s some rainforest plants and some colourful cottagey ones as the air is cooler up on the mountain. Here’s some photos I took during our walk.

Artworks of the month: Shadow and reflection

This month I’m reviewing three photographs that make use of shadow and reflection as subject. When I approached these subjects I was looking for a fresh, simple, and immediate response….how to make a balanced and harmonious image using only a few elements. The two “Shadow” photos make use of light as well as shade to create an almost abstract image. I was interested in the pattern created on the wall surface, and repeat pattern is a principle that can easily be applied to both photography and painting. I use knowledge gained from my painting experience and apply this to photography in order to balance elements such as contrast e.g. dark/light and large spaces/pattern. These images are almost monochromatic in colour scheme.

The other image I’m reviewing is that of “Rocks and Reflection”. Taken in a fern house of the local botanic gardens, this image shows double layers of interest….that of the pebbles and water, overlaid with reflections from the overhanging fern trees. The colour is also limited, which prevents the subject from becoming too complex and distracting. I also like the way the multiple layers bring forth different textures, and the elements in the subject possess a delicacy which creates visual interest.