Works in progress

Progress on abstraction

Progress on second abstraction

At present I’m working on a couple of abstractions. The painting above isn’t titled yet, but the one below is from the “Underwater world” series. The process is enjoyable, yet sometimes problematic in minor ways, as I work on creating balance between the elements and adjusting the colour combinations. Art is always an exploration into the unknown, and this process covers some parts of our souls and reveals others…it’s a metaphor for the psyche moving and shaping itself….sometimes very unpredictable yet always fascinating. To me abstraction i.e. non-representational art, is a very pure form. It relies very little on ideas and, for myself anyway, is a highly intuitive mode of creating…..usually unexpected and fresh.

Process stage

Progress on “Another underwater world”

Artworks of the month: Shadow and reflection

This month I’m reviewing three photographs that make use of shadow and reflection as subject. When I approached these subjects I was looking for a fresh, simple, and immediate response….how to make a balanced and harmonious image using only a few elements. The two “Shadow” photos make use of light as well as shade to create an almost abstract image. I was interested in the pattern created on the wall surface, and repeat pattern is a principle that can easily be applied to both photography and painting. I use knowledge gained from my painting experience and apply this to photography in order to balance elements such as contrast e.g. dark/light and large spaces/pattern. These images are almost monochromatic in colour scheme.

The other image I’m reviewing is that of “Rocks and Reflection”. Taken in a fern house of the local botanic gardens, this image shows double layers of interest….that of the pebbles and water, overlaid with reflections from the overhanging fern trees. The colour is also limited, which prevents the subject from becoming too complex and distracting. I also like the way the multiple layers bring forth different textures, and the elements in the subject possess a delicacy which creates visual interest.